A pain-stricken patient was referred by a resident colleague to clarify a headache that had been existing for several weeks. The patient had already been unsuccessful with several doctors. After a detailed medical history and a clinical examination, we found that the patient had received numerous dental surgeries from her dentist a few weeks ago. The review of the conservative restorations on our part revealed that some fillings had not been sufficiently ground into the occlusion. After the treating dentist corrected the bite, the headaches were gone.

This example from our clinic illustrates the importance of the doctor-patient conversation in a particularly clear way. Headaches can be primary or secondary and have a variety of causes. The reasons for a headache are not easy to find out even for a professional. Secondary headaches arise from other diseases. The most common types are migraine, cluster headache and tension-type headache. Patients can provide the physician with important help by keeping a journal of their headaches.

The daily routine recorded in writing can provide the specialist with important information on the causes.

Patients should seek medical attention immediately if they suddenly experience extreme headache. It could be a serious acute condition that has to be ruled out by clinical examination and MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) or CT (computed tomography).

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