Aphthae are small ulcers that form on the inflamed mucous membrane of the mouth.

They look spotty with a yellowish coating and usually remain for two weeks until they disappear again.

The clear process of the development of aphthae is still largely unknown today. Women are more likely than men to be affected by hormone changes. Aphthae often occur in the affected life for a long time.

Even children can already be affected. The cause is suspected of micro-lesions of the oral mucosa, stress or an unbalanced lifestyle.

Vitamin A deficiency, food allergies, immunodeficiency (e.g., HI viral infection) or genetic predisposition may also be beneficial for the development of aphthae.
Specialists divide aphthae into three sizes:

The most common form are very small aphthae a few millimeters in size, often on the inside of the cheeks and lips. This minor form disappeared again after about two weeks.

The rarer major form is characterized by large spots (a few inches) and occurs on the lips and in the back palate. It can lead for up to two months and heals with a scar.

The very rare herpetifomer type can become very uncomfortable and resemble herpes blisters. It spreads over the entire oral mucosa and spreads over approximately 14 days.

It is important to distinguish between an aphid and a herpes infection. The symptoms can be very similar. The Coxackie virus can be found in the mouth and blisters on the hands and feet. Aphthae attack the oral mucosa and ingested hot or sour foods cause severe pain to those affected. Spontaneous bleeding of the mucous membrane, fatigue, dysphagia and the occurrence of bad breath are possible.

The diagnosis is made by the specialist through the anamnesis and an examination.

The treatment extends only to combating the symptoms. Those affected should refrain from alcohol and irritant foods.

In addition, on-demand pain medication and an antibacterial mouthwash can provide relief.

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